Why I Turned Down Apple For A Startup

fastcompany:

On Sunday nights, will you dread going back to work on Monday? In three years, will you want to be at the same company? These are all small, but important things. When ‘work doesn’t seem like work,’ quality of life soars.”

It’s essential to have a clear understanding of why you’re in a certain role or pursuing a certain direction.  It’s too common these days just because it’s what is expected of you or because it provides a pay check.  It’s important to make informed decisions that determine the direction your life will take instead of letting things happen to you.  If you allow the latter to happen, you could find yourself years or decades from now not sure what you’ve been working so hard and long on with mountains of confusion and regret.  A little self inquiry will go a long way.

Understanding your priorities is crucial.  By knowing what is important to you and how you want it to take shape, you can determine what path is going to be best for you.  Certain positions and certain companies are not going to fit your priorities well, so instead of trying to fit a square peg into a round hole, try to find someplace to be that gels with you.

Your work and home lives should exist harmoniously.  For many, their professional and personal lives operate on two completely separate planes, never ever coming together.  It’s an oil and vinegar relationship which will often time lead to conflict, extra stress, and confusion.  The work you do “in the office” versus the work you do “at home” should communicate well with each other and allow for the demands that arise in either setting.  It should never be an either or situation.  Think of the two as the two people in a marriage.  If one is always placing demands on the other without providing thoughtful consideration and in the end making compromises, the partnership is likely to end badly.  The way you balance your professional and personal dynamic is no different.

This article showcases the thought process someone took in determining what should be his next path.  Instead of being instantly lured by the flash a Fortune 10 company can provide, he took a moment to step back and consider what he really wanted for himself both in the short term and in the long term.  The process may take some time but the potential gain and reward will far outweigh the possible negative consequences of trying to do something that doesn’t fit your priorities or values well.

- Derrick S. Wong, CEO of Winning Solutions Advisory LLC.

www.WSAWINS.com / 855.  WSA.  WINS / @WSAdvisory

www.DerrickSWong.com / Linkedin.com/in/DerrickSWong

Winning Solutions Advisory is a management advisory firm designed to help small to mid-size companies examine the effectiveness of their planning and innovation strategies regarding business strategy, branding, technology, finance, and legal.  Our “call to fame” is identifying opportunities of potential in both startup and established companies before even the management or market has identified them.  We then help to develop sound methods to transform the objectives into reality.

Source: fastcompany
  1. derrickswong reblogged this from fastcompany and added:
    It’s essential to have a clear understanding of why you’re in a certain role or pursuing a certain direction. It’s too...
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  13. ericshasha reblogged this from fastcompany and added:
    True
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  16. crogawski reblogged this from fastcompany and added:
    also why a career change (or tweak) is a good thing